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Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)

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Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
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TOPIC: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)

JKMakowka - 24 Jun 2015 15:13
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
This recent blog-post has some pictures of the modified versions:
blog.americanstandard-us.com/2015/04/15/...-sub-saharan-africa/
mchalej - 26 Jun 2015 16:53
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Alfonso,

You can contact Cresstanks at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it to request samples.

Feel free to e-mail me directly at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it if you have trouble connecting with the right people.

Jim
canaday - 27 Jun 2015 11:54
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Hi Jim and everyone,

It would be good to include this into a solid, lightweight, recycled-plastic outhouse to be used as an ArborLoo (over one shallow pit, then another, then planting trees). I even suggest building with no roof, as this would reduce cost, weight and smells, plus each rain would wash the floor and all surfaces, next the sun would help to sterilize them. (And the plastic could likely be protected from the UV somehow.)

It is also key to only promote this model where the soil is absorbant, the water table is low, and there is no flooding. In those conditions, it would be better to buiid UDDTs raised above the high water line.

Best wishes.
Chris

PS: I have been silent lately, as I have been translating the Faecal Sludge Management book (www.unesco-ihe.org/faecal-sludge-management-0) into Spanish. (¿Hay hispanos que quisieran ayudar a revisar mi traducción o asignar esto a sus alumnos? Sería una forma de leerlo antes de que salga oficialmente ... y contribuir a que esta información esté presentada a América Latina y España de la mejor manera. Podrían ser unos capítulos sueltos, pero mejor todo el libro de una, tal vez asignando un capítulo a cada alumno en una clase universitaria, para que haga un resumen y, de paso, vea cualquier falla o concepto que es difícil de entender. Me podrían escribir por interno mediante el botón debajo de me foto a la izquierda. Gracias.)
ben - 28 Jun 2015 18:03
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Hi Jim, Hi everyone,

Thanks for sending me a sample to bring in Mauritania for my mission there trying to shape a sanitation marketing program in the desert. Hard job with population very poor, hard soil, small civil society, etc ... amongst other difficulties.

Almost none of the CLTS latrine that I saw were "improved". The heat makes them pretty odorless and there's almost no flies by 48°C. There's never a roof on the latrines so the VIP system couldn't work properly. No-one understood the need to close the hole with something and put some mesh on the ventilation pipe. The siphon is too expensive and for the cases I saw, either it was evaporated (less than 4 hours they mentioned) or people were unhappy because it consumes too much water.
The problems all come during the rainy season (August - October) when flies appear in mass and diarrhoea too.

Basically, they loved it in the field and there's a great potential in the sahel region but still in the program this seems complicated to organise all the logistic or spreding the Sato Pan in the desert.

Another question that I wanted to ask you on this forum so everyone could benefit the answer. Because there's no roof the pan would be exposed to high UV aggression, was there any test realised on the resistance of the SaTo Pan to UV ?

Thanks,

Ben
muench - 29 Jun 2015 11:32
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
For those following this thread on SaTo pan, I also wanted to highlight that Sherina's company in Uganda has also used them successfully, see here:
forum.susana.org/forum/categories/87-new...tion-of-susana#13251

Sherina said in that thread:

The SaTo pan has proven to be a really popular product for latrine improvement - both in terms of affordability and the benefits of making a latrine more hygienic, free from flies and safe for children. Since October 2014, SSG has sold over 2700 pans. SSG is identifying strategic partners through whom to distribute the pans both in the rural and urban areas which will help to achieve wider scale and impact.

More information about all our products and services can be found on our website www.sanitationsolutionsgroup.com
Alfonso - 29 Jun 2015 11:49
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Dear Jim,

Thank very much for your attention and for the information.

I will keep you updated.

Alfonso
mandefro - 03 Jul 2015 08:03
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
dear
it is nice to see affordable sanitation system for sub-Saharan Africa where sanitation problem is relatively high!i just want to introduce the sanitation product to my community in Addis Abeba,Ethiopia,can i get more information on this!
Arjen - 07 Aug 2015 10:26
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Dear all,

I have been looking for a location to discuss the technical and share practical experiences of the SatoPan. I felt that this topic thread is a bit broader and therefore I have opened a new topic, click here:
"Practical and technical questions on use and installation of SaTo pan".


I hope you will be able to contribute to that thread as well!

thank you,

Arjen Naafs
Regional Technical Advisor WaterAir South Asia
Alfonso - 09 Aug 2015 11:58
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Ok Arjen. Thank you.

I also take advantage to update Jim: The contact has been very successful. Thank you very much for your support on this issue. We will keep in touch.

Best regards,

Alfonso
canaday - 08 Feb 2016 04:31
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Dear Jim,

How are things going with the SaTo pour-flush squat pan?

Has anyone tried SaTo pans in ArborLoos? I am advising on a project for 250 persons in a periurban/rural area on a far-flung Indonesian island, which seems like a great location for such a trial, as there is no flooding and the soil seems dry and absorbent, plus the users are squatters and washers.

Is anal wash water sufficient to flush a SaTo? (How much water do washers use?)

Can you sell us 50 SaTo pans? Are they sold in Indonesia? Can they be shipped from Bangladesh? Can they be purchased in the USA? Any chance of a donation in the interest of piloting the SaTo in ArborLoos?

Thanks for your help. Keep up the good work.

Best wishes,
Chris Canaday
mchalej - 17 Feb 2016 06:23
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Hi Chris, I see from other sources that you've already managed to get in touch with RFL Plastics in Bangladesh. I'll try to answer some of your questions below:

1) I am not aware of a SaTo being applied in an Arborloo but do not see why it couldn't work.

2) SaTo products are currently produced in Bangladesh and Uganda but can be shipped anywhere in the world. The contact addresses for order placement are:

Crestanks, Limited
Plot No. 265 Jinja Road, Bweyogerere—Namanve.
P.O. Box 11381, Kampala (Uganda).
Tel No1: +256-312-262-015
Tel No2: +256-312-262-016
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
www.crestanks.co.ug/

Or

PRAN‐RFL GROUP
PRAN‐RFL Center
05 Middle Badda, Dhaka‐1212, Bangladesh
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
www.rflplastics.com

3) The products in Bangladesh and Uganda are intentionally different. The Uganda version uses less water and can be more easily installed without concrete. The Bangladesh version requires more water to "flush" but can be connected to a 4" pipe and offset pit via a second part sold by RFL called the "SaTo Connection Box."

4) The Uganda version could, in theory, be flushed with anal wash water. The weight of the waste itself is usually sufficient to open the door. The pan only requires rinsing after use to clean adhered material. This can be done with spray bottle made by punching a small hole in the cap of a PET water bottle.

5) We keep a small inventory at American Standard HQ in New Jersey and can ship small orders (<10 pieces) from there.

Thanks,

Jim
aashenafia - 12 Apr 2017 14:24
Re: Sanitation Product Development for Sub-Saharan Africa - affordable, aspirational latrine products, SaTo (American Standard Brands, USA and Water for People)
Hi Jim,

Are the SaTo products still produced only in Bangladesh and Uganda?

I see the counterweight cup design of SaTo pans manufactured in Uganda are different from the Bangladesh ones so that the flap require less water to open. Please can you explain the counterweight cup design of the Uganda version and the fill up procedure during installation? Does it also require concrete to fill it?

How many versions of different SaTo pan products are manufactured so far? Do they have product or model names to identify one version with another?

Are there any developments on the ceramic model of SaTo pan?

Thank you
Ashenafi
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